Slide toggle

Welcome to Mamie Till Mobley Enterprise, Inc.

Mamie Till Mobley Enterprise, Inc. is here to guide today’s leaders in their journey to create more inclusive, safer worlds.

MamieTaughtMe

Blog + Podcast

4 Ways to Make Money for Our Movements in 2018

My 2018 Money for Our Movements Conference Notes

This past weekend I attended my first Money for Our Movements Social Justice Fundraising Conference in Atlanta, Georgia. If you follow me on Instagram, you may have seen my stories throughout the weekend. However, I know the few moments I did capture cannot fully depict how powerful this experience was for me and many others.

MFOM Conference Notes

From Asking for Money, Towards Mobilizing Our Resources for the People’s New Economy

There were so many great presenters and a lot of information. I couldn’t attend every session but this post is a summary of my experience and what I learned at the 7th biennial Money for Our Movements: A Social Justice Fundraising Conference. As an activist/organizer, I like many others, was making the mistake of not viewing myself as also a fundraiser. Fundraising and organizing are often seen as separate but we do our work and organizations a disservice when we don’t recognize that fundraising is a piece of the broader work of resource mobilizing.

Grassroots Institute for Fundraising Training also known as G.I.F.T. presented this years’ conference introducing it’s perspective “What happens when we stop asking for money and start mobilizing our resources?” This question was challenged by some attendees, arguing that money or some other form of currency is in fact a resource. I heard opinions across the spectrum about this concept of “asking” for money, and what resonated with me were these three things:

  1. We must have a real dialogue about our relationship with money. Think back to your oldest memory of money. Has that shaped how you feel when you give money? Does that impact how you ask for money? If money has been used to oppress you or your experiences with money have been around a struggle, you may have a strong desire to skirt around asking for it. This will commonly show up when you appeal donors as a fundraiser.  Whatever your relationship to money is, you must acknowledge that and then make a decision over and over again about how you will allow it to show up in your life. Share your money story with me in the comments section.
  2. Language used to talk about money matters. It became clear to me that people who had done their “self-work” around money spoke very differently about it. At the opening plenary, Mary Hooks of SONG said that she is not walking into a room begging for anything. That those who don’t want to give, simply won’t be able to claim that they were a part of the story. Veronica Garcia of Detained Migrant Solidarity Committee spoke of fundraising as a negotiation process for reparations and returning resources back to our communities. I noticed this language garnered different reactions from the audience.
  3. The “ask” is not about you! When you show up in a space to fundraise for a cause, you show up with all of the people who benefit from the success of the campaign. You have to get over yourself, let your fear take a back seat and say it with your chest. It may take some time to sike yourself into making a major ask to a prospective donor, but all of those feeling are truly a distraction. Don’t make fundraising about you, make it about the donors ability to move the needle on issues they truly care about.

As you can probably tell from these three take aways alone, the conference was intense. But experiencing this conference was so much less about our feelings about being fundraisers, and more about how this part of our organizing work helps get us the liberation our people deserve. I left this conference ready to hold myself and others accountable for collecting coins for a cause!

4 Ways to Make Money for Our Movements in 2018

RAPID RESPONSE FUNDRAISING IN A CRISIS

What is a Rapid Response moment? It happens when a crisis is dominating the national or local media. It requires immediate action and usually produces an emotional or moral response from the general public. A benefit of hosting a fundraiser during a rapid response moment is that this type of fundraising can grow your brands profile, increase your human resources and potentially generate a lot of money for your movement. Here are a few principles to keep in mind: 1.) You must trust your instincts. If a you see the topic or story shared on social media several times in a short period of time, chances are it’s going to be big. 2.) Experiment during calmer moments. You only rise to the level of your training. So when you are not operating in crisis mode, you need to attend workshops, try reaching a target audience via a new method and focus on developing a new skill. Your Rapid Response moment is not the time to play around with Facebook Ads. You should already know what works. 3.) Remember that time is of the essence. It is a crisis and you need to respond usually within a 12 hour time span. A week later is too late. You want to be one of the first, if not the first to speak out on the issue and take action so that you can be seen as the authoritative source. 4.) Amplify your work by making it visible. Diversify your media-worthy tactics. Utilize Facebook Live. Reach out to your local news reporter that specializes on this topic and go on the record with journalists. 5.) Saturate people with opportunities to contribute to the moment. Ask for money early, often and repeatedly. Create ways for new supporters to engage. It is best practice to anticipate and prepare for Rapid Response moments by developing a timeline in advance of when it would be an appropriate point within the crisis to ask for money (i.e. Release of breaking news or times of arrest). Be sure to optimize your donation page for mobile devices. Most folks will be following the news and hopefully you’re campaign, you will want to direct them to a place to take action. Make sure the language on the donation page is easy to understand, timely and meaningful. Throughout the campaign, be sure to follow through and report back to your supporters. This again, is another opportunity to ask for money. (Read this article to learn more: Foundation Donors, Which Marketing Channel is Your Best Source)

DONOR VISIT DRIVES

One of the most intimidating settings for fundraising has to be in someones home, but once you master how to make an ask during a Donor Visit Drive it is possible to bring in major donors and possibly turn them into reoccurring donors. The key is to remember what’s at stake. Dondy Marie Moreland and Mary Grace Wolf of People’s Action Institute presented on this topic at the conference and reminded the audience that the National Rifle Association (NRA) has 5 million dues paying members that raise 5 million dollars per year. That’s a lot of money that I wish was going to support gun violence prevention policy and programming. This really drove home the importance of asking powerful people for money. We must get better at telling our stories. Here’s how you can kick off your Donor Visit Drive: 1.) Identify a target list from people who have given previously or from people who are prospects that you believe should be giving. 2.) Send them a letter. Snail mail, although a bit old fashion, works best (You can send an email, but know that this is something you would send to a segmented list of donors). The name and address should both be handwritten. Use a real stamp. Remember, this is not for solicitation purposes so do not include an envelop. Instead, talk about the great things you’ve done and let them know that you’ll be calling them later in the week to set up a visit with them. 3.) A week later make the call. Keep it short and ask them if they received the letter you sent them. If they don’t recall seeing the letter, give them a brief refresher and share it’s highlights. Ask for their availability for an in-person visit. Don’t say “meeting” because this language may cause stress. Instead use the term “visit” which sounds very casual. 4.) Have the visit. Assume their home is the best location to meet for them (if this is something you simply don’t feel comfortable doing, ask if you can meet at their nearest coffee shop). Don’t be apologetic! By the time you arrive for your Donor Visit, there should be no question that this visit is about money. Start off with a time check and express both of your expectations about time. The visit should be around 30 to 45 minutes. Don’t be weird, have some small talk in the beginning to warm each other up to the conversation and to learn about anything that may be a red flag. Red flags are things you’ll want to avoid around their political persuasion. After that you can quickly move into your Personal Story. Your Personal Story is how you are connected to the movement. Remember that this visit is not about you, so keep your Personal Story short (approx. 1 min). Then you will want to share two campaign stories. The first will be your Victory Story. Your victory story should be a success story, one with a beginning, a middle and an end. The second, an Unfinished Story, one where you are currently seeking support. The Unfinished Story should have a beginning and maybe even a middle, but no ending, at that point you will be making an ask. You can make your ask as a statement or a question. After you make your ask, it’s very important that you don’t try to fill the space or you could talk your donor out of giving. Get the money before making any other asks around donor engagement. Have contribution forms on hand or be able to walk them through submitting their payment online or with a hand held device. Write their information on the form for them so that it is legible to you. After the transactional piece of the visit is complete, it is appropriate to ask who else in their network would be able to give at that same level and if they would be willing to make a personal introduction to 1-5 people.

SUSTAINER OR MATCH GRANT PROGRAMS

Sustainer or Match Grant Programs are given by community organizations who focus on giving to organizations that build through grassroots fundraising. Organizations like National Farm Worker Ministry and Durham CAN (Congregations, Associations and Neighborhoods) have had great success with Match Grant Programs. They started collecting small donations and individual gifts, but were able to garner matches for those gifts when they began to have listening sessions and and relational meetings with other stakeholders. They started fundraising through printed newsletters, e-appeals and newsletters to garner support at the individual level and then were able to bring in larger amounts through launching campaigns where each individual gift was matched it’s first time by larger foundations through their Match Grant Program. DrumCan successful fundraising has brought them reoccurring donors through dues paying membership program and new collaborative partnerships which help to sustain their work. If your foundation focuses on Peer-to-Peer fundraising or individual gifts, this is something you should look into. Although the Fund 4 Democratic Communities will be sunsetting their organization, they encouraged attendees at the conference to use their proposal template to encourage their local organizations to create sustainer or match grant programs for their communities. Email Mildred Powell with Fund4 Democratic Communities at Mildred@F4DC.org for a copy of the proposal template.

PLANNED GIVING

Planned Giving is when someone bequeaths money or their belongings to your organization. This can feel like an insensitive inquisition to make to someone, but it doesn’t have to be. The California Community Foundation, which recently had a house bequeathed to their organization, has a toolkit accessible on their website to help you make a Planned Giving campaign. This ask is one where you can make an ask during life moments when they are updating their will. A Planned Giving ask typically takes place at the time your donor is purchasing a new house, getting married or at the birth of a new baby. It doesn’t have to occur on someones death bed. This does not have to be an ask of guilt, but rather a decision made in someone’s 20’s or 30’s. Have a brochure with a photo of the good work you’ve been doing or plan to do with their gift, not their last will and testament. It is very common for people to give of their estate, property and even money from their life insurance policy.

 

There was a wealth of knowledge and information shared at the Money for Our Movements Conference and I couldn’t possible share everything. I myself was also excited about having the opportunity to share my money story, desire for justice for my cousin Emmett Till and what I knew about tech that could help social justice organizers and fundraisers in my presentation Change Agent, Give Yourself a Break: Systems and Resources to Run Your Life and Business on Autopilot. The highlight was having my mom co-present with me. We were a riot! If you missed the conference, you’ll have to wait 2 years for the next one, but I pray these notes will bless you and your foundation’s bank account in 2018.

If you didn’t catch my presentation, no worries. I’ll be hosting it as a webinar with JP Higher Ed. Click here to stay tuned for the details.

7 Ways to Beat Google’s Bias Algorithms

Learn 7 ways to beat Google’s bias algorithm so that you can began ranking #1 in search engine results.

Buy More Black Challenge: Day 21

New to Buy More Black Challenge: The Ultimate Guide? Learn more about it HERE.

Week 3: Leverage Your Buying Power

This Week’s Goal: Learn how to progress from loyal fan to an influencer for black owned brands.

Day 21: Start a Business or Buy a Company

Today’s Task: Start your dream business or buy a company you’ve always loved.

Over the last few days we’ve talked about how important owning a business is to the Black community. We know that buying from black business owners is impactful, but without black lenders (i.e. bondholders) and black investors (i.e. stockholders) the chances of sustaining a black business are drastically decreased. Entrepreneurship is based in risk already, but deciding to build a black owned business can be of greater risk due to discrimination from banks and buyers. My hope is that through this challenge we have debunked many myths about what it means to buy black and inspired you to be a part of the circulation of the black dollar in the black community.

If you are still rocking with me on this last day — Congrats on making it all the way to the end of the Buy More Black Challenge! Let’s continue to be conscious buyers and if you need more support you can continue to chat with us over in the private FB group. There is a very engaged community there sharing articles and holding valuable dialogues on black buying power there.

Education around business and financial literacy are the first steps to changing the mindset around buying black owned products, services and companies. Share this challenge with a friend to spread the knowledge and keep the conversation going!

You can reach out to me here:

Twitter: @mamietaughtme

Instagram: @mamietaughtme

Private Facebook Group: Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK

(If you’re new to the Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK Private Facebook Group make sure to fill out the questionnaire HERE before requesting to join.)

Stocks Shares Bonds

Buy More Black Challenge: Day 20

New to Buy More Black Challenge: The Ultimate Guide? Learn more about it HERE.

Week 3: Leverage Your Buying Power

This Week’s Goal: Learn how to progress from loyal fan to an influencer for Black owned Brands.

Stocks Shares Bonds

Day 20: Purchase Stock, Shares and Bonds

Today’s Task: Purchase Stock, Shares and Bonds

As we near the end of our #BuyMoreBlack Challenge. I want you to ask yourself which of the black-owned businesses stood out the most to you and why. Now ask yourself how much you are willing to give to see that business be successful?

If you believe in the growth and expansion of a particular brand, you should definitely look into doing one of the following three things.

Stockholders do not own corporations; they own shares issued by corporations. This affords them various privileges like vote in shareholder meetings and receive part of the company’s profits if and when they are earned. It also gives you the right to sell your shares to somebody else. Stocks give you power within a company as a shareholder. This is a high risk investment because most companies don’t payout dividends to stockholders. That money is usually re-invested into the business.

Bondholders on the other hand serve as creditors to companies and have priority in the ranking of profit collections. Bondholders act as lenders to companies and can also charge interest on borrowed money. The debt owed to the bondholder is called a bond. Should the company fold, bondholders are the first to have their repayment processed. Bondholders have legal priority to profits should the company go bankrupt.

Both of these options are a risk, but investing and entrepreneurship is based in taking risks… The higher the risk, the greater the reward!

If you’re new to investing and want to know more, go to https://www.investopedia.com

You can reach out to me here:

Twitter: @mamietaughtme

Instagram: @mamietaughtme

Private Facebook Group: Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK

(If you’re new to the Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK Private Facebook Group make sure to fill out the questionnaire HERE before requesting to join.)

Buy More Black Challenge: Day 19

New to Buy More Black Challenge: The Ultimate Guide? Learn more about it HERE.

Week 3: Leverage Your Buying Power

This Week’s Goal: Learn how to progress from loyal fan to an influencer for Black owned Brands.

Day 19: Impact Change With Philanthropy

Today’s Task: Impact change with philanthropy

After yesterday’s task, hopefully you are feeling really empowered about what you can do with your money and how you can use your buying power. You really can make an impact when you are a conscious consumer. Perhaps you aren’t ready to buy a black-owned business, but maybe you want to give a donation, small or large, to a black startup company.

You’ve probably seen people promote their new tech idea or even their desire to launch a new business or movie project on Kickstarter and GoFundMe. These two platforms aren’t particularly my favorite choices for crowdfunding (I explain why in my Platform to Justice program) but I do agree with their concept in allowing the community to back projects they believe in and essentially help turn nothing into something. It’s actually really a genius idea! You get to determine the validity of your idea before you launch and waste money on something nobody wants. Lack of funding is a major reason why a lot of ideas don’t take off. Through your support of both social sharing and giving a small monetary donation, many people can see their dreams come true, some even overnight. So, today, consider finding a friend or even a stranger that could use some extra cash to turn their hobby into a business.

You can reach out to me here:

Twitter: @mamietaughtme

Instagram: @mamietaughtme

Private Facebook Group: Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK

(If you’re new to the Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK Private Facebook Group make sure to fill out the questionnaire HERE before requesting to join.)

Buy More Black Challenge: Day 18

New to Buy More Black Challenge: The Ultimate Guide? Learn more about it HERE.

Week 3: Leverage Your Buying Power

This Week’s Goal: Learn how to progress from loyal fan to an influencer for Black owned Brands.

Day 18: Become a Venture Capitalist or Angel Investor

Today’s Task: Read up on what it would take to become a venture capitalist or angel investor

When news broke that Travel Noire was being acquired by Blavity, I freaked! For those of you who may not know, Travel Noire is a platform for black travel enthusiasts ran by Zim Ugochukwu. I supported the brand 1. because I loved the curated content on their instagram. It had me dreaming of a full time career as a lifestyle and travel blogger and 2. A few of my college friends joined Zim’s team (Shout out to Skye, Mark and Jasmine) and I knew how hard they were working to bring great content and amazing cultural excursions to people who never believed travel would ever be an option for them. Many people saw the value and depth that Travel Noire possessed early on. So it didn’t surprise me that it’s success took off right away. Enter Blavity, one of the fastest growing digital media outlets on the web and reaches more than 7M millennials a month and is still run by its founders Morgan DeBaun, Aaron Samuels, Jonathan Jackson, and Jeff Nelson.

I was already following Morgan on instagram and had been a long time follower of Blavity’s content since it’s founding in 2014. So I knew it’s founders were young black creatives. Up until Blavity acquired Travel Noire, it never dawned on me that Black businesses could invest in other businesses in that way. Now I realize it’s essential to sustain resources in the black community.

We can buy black-owned but unless the businesses have black backers that invest in them, they will always look for more money from outside of the black community so that they can continue to grow their empire. Often, that’s where the buck ends, because of bank and venture capitalist bias against black business owners. So if you are interested in learning more about investing in black owned businesses check out these resources below:

Pssst…Here’s How To Become A Venture Capitalist

11 Black Venture Capitalists Getting Attention In The US

A Growing Group Of Black Angel Investors Is Making Up For The Funding Biases In Venture Capital

You can reach out to me here:

Twitter: @mamietaughtme

Instagram: @mamietaughtme

Private Facebook Group: Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK

(If you’re new to the Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK Private Facebook Group make sure to fill out the questionnaire HERE before requesting to join.)

Buy More Black Challenge: Day 17

New to Buy More Black Challenge: The Ultimate Guide? Learn more about it HERE.

Week 3: Leverage Your Buying Power

This Week’s Goal: Learn how to progress from loyal fan to an influencer for Black owned Brands.

Day 17: Earn Your First Affiliate Commission

Today’s Task: Earn your first affiliate commission

One of the major excuses I hear about buying black is that it’s too expensive. This really is an interesting concept to me because we know that people will spend their money on whatever they find to be valuable. Still, finding great deals is something people search for and even look forward to. I mean, who doesn’t love a good sale, right?

The issue with that is, it often costs more for black-owned businesses to sustain their businesses and to bring you their products and services. They cannot compete with the prices offered in Walmart or Target. That expectation, simply isn’t realistic. So remember, all the way back to Day 2 of this challenge when I shared that you had to be committed financially? That’s because I know, bargain shopping at giant stores is tempting, but it’s often at a great expense to the black community because those dollars do not profit the black community.

I know. I know. Our finances often dictate our spending habits, rather than our spending habits dictating where our money goes. So I figured the best way to help you out with today’s task is to share black-owned businesses that will pay you back for shopping with them when your friends buy from them too. That way it’s a win-win situation for all. Click here to find my list of black-owned affiliate programs inside of the Resource Library.

You can reach out to me here:

Twitter: @mamietaughtme

Instagram: @mamietaughtme

Private Facebook Group: Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK

(If you’re new to the Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK Private Facebook Group make sure to fill out the questionnaire HERE before requesting to join.)

Buy More Black Challenge: Day 16

New to Buy More Black Challenge: The Ultimate Guide? Learn more about it HERE.

Week 3: Leverage Your Buying Power

This Week’s Goal: Learn how to progress from loyal fan to an influencer for Black owned Brands.

Day 16: Influence What Others Buy with Social Sharing

Today’s Task: Influence what others buy with social sharing

Today’s task is really a no brainer for most. I want you to take yesterday’s task a step further. In day 15 you were asked to write the perfect review, especially for black-owned business. Consider sharing that review on your social media sites so that all of your closest friends (or even a couple thousand total strangers) can see those products or services highlighted on your pages. You never know, someone may be looking for a recommendation on that thing. Influencing what others buy with social sharing not only helps the vendor, but it helps out people who have been searching for vendors who can address their pain points.

How often do you re-post your reviews or purchases you’ve bought online on social media? Have you ever bought something that you read a good review for on social media? Tell us in the comments.

You can reach out to me here:

Twitter: @mamietaughtme

Instagram: @mamietaughtme

Private Facebook Group: Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK

(If you’re new to the Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK Private Facebook Group make sure to fill out the questionnaire HERE before requesting to join.)

Buy More Black Challenge: Day 15

New to Buy More Black Challenge: The Ultimate Guide? Learn more about it HERE.

Week 3: Leverage Your Buying Power

This Week’s Goal: Learn how to progress from loyal fan to an influencer for Black owned Brands.

Day 15: Write the Perfect Review

Today’s Task: Write the perfect review

Writing a good review for a business is more than just suggesting that people should buy it. It’s proven that what people say in reviews matters to other consumers who are considering buying a product or service.

When you write a good review you’ll want to keep this checklist in mind.

  1. Leave a detailed describe of the product or service.
  2. Share what you loved most and why it was beneficial for you to purchase
  3. Don’t half-ass it! Use complete sentences.
  4. Use words that are descriptive and paint a vivid picture for the reader
  5. Write the review in your own voice.
  6. Explain the urgency of why people shouldn’t wait to buy
  7. Include a photo of you with the product or finished service.
  8. Always tell the truth. Don’t every say anything that wasn’t true or write a review for a product/service you didn’t actually purchase.

By the time a consumer checks for reviews, they have already determined that they would like to buy the product or service. People check reviews for affirmation that they should buy a product. What you say others should spend their money on, is a great way to leverage your influence and control other people’s buying power. So next time, be sure to leave a review and help a black-owned business out with a stellar review if they have earned it!

You can reach out to me here:

Twitter: @mamietaughtme

Instagram: @mamietaughtme

Private Facebook Group: Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK

(If you’re new to the Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK Private Facebook Group make sure to fill out the questionnaire HERE before requesting to join.)

Buy More Black Challenge: Day 14

New to Buy More Black Challenge: The Ultimate Guide? Learn more about it HERE.

Week 2: Become a Conscious Consumer

This Week’s Goal: Learn the seven step process that will make it much easier for you to start buying more Black products and services.

Day 14: State the facts about black-owned businesses

Today’s Task: State the facts about black-owned businesses

I know we already addressed limiting beliefs about black businesses but I still believe there is so much more to be said to debunk some myths about what it means to be a black business owner.

The decision to go into entrepreneurship is not an easy one. Being Black, and for those that don’t identify as a man, you may feel that you are at an extreme disadvantage when it comes to opportunities, access of information and resources. Just cause you may feel something, doesn’t mean that has to be your experience for the duration of your life. Many black entrepreneurs have gone on to do great things and collectively the statistics show, that we’re doing alright. Take a look below and check it out!

BLACK ENTREPRENEUR FACTS

  • There are currently 1,531,494 black women-owned businesses in the United States
  • 44 percent of those women-owned firms are owned by minority women. Those owned by black women in particular employ around 376,500 workers and generate $51.4 billion in revenue.

 

All statistics are from the 2018 published Nielsen research unless otherwise stated.

BLACK BUYING POWER STATISTICS

  • African Americans spending $1.2 trillion annually
  • Black shoppers spent $473 million in total hair care in 2017 (a $4.2 billion industry)
  • Half of the total spend ($941 million) on dry grains and vegetables in the U.S. in 2017 came from consumers of color.

 

All statistics are from the 2018 published Nielsen research unless otherwise stated.

THE POWER OF THE MULTICULTURAL CONSUMER DOLLAR

You can reach out to me here:

Twitter: @mamietaughtme

Instagram: @mamietaughtme

Private Facebook Group: Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK

(If you’re new to the Mamie Taught Me: BUY MORE BLACK Private Facebook Group make sure to fill out the questionnaire HERE before requesting to join.)